issue Forty four

 

      

 

  • Published 7 November 2006

     


BRIEF NOTES FROM THE EDITOR

It's one of the most powerful and fascinating editions of Eye Spy we have ever published. Readers will find three specially commissioned features on
tradecraft and the intelligence services, besides several major reports on the work of the security services relating to espionage and counter-intelligence.

We receive dozens of enquiries each month from readers wanting to learn more about the training that potential operatives undertake as they endeavour to
carve out a career in the security services. So what's it really like? Training techniques are carefully guarded secrets, but we can relate basic
scenarios and reveal a few tips from the real spooks who ply their trade in countries across the world. For those interested in real tradecraft this edition is a must.

Readers will also find the first feature of a new series - DIY Spycraft. In coming issues readers can learn from our experts who have spent years adapting ordinary devices and turning them into more powerful tools. Other features will actually show you how to build spy equipment - including room bugs, spy cameras, audio devices and much more. Dozens of tips and specialist advice will help you save a small fortune. Use the material responsibly!

Our feature on intelligence crests (featured in Eye Spy 43) proved hugely popular. But in this edition we finally solve the mystery of Britain's Secret Intelligence Service (SIS/MI6) crest! You don't want to miss this! A reminder also that all new subscribers receive a free high-quality full-colour giant poster of the world's intelligence crests. Some are well known, but others very rare. It's a unique free gift.

There's just time for me to mention our new subscription card. All new and existing subscribers can use the card to save money on selected items. Wherever the card appears alongside a product, the item is discounted for subscribers. It's just one more reason why taking out a subscription to Eye Spy is fantastic value.

A brief overview of Eye Spy Intelligence Magazine now follows....

Mark Birdsall
Editor


The Dark Arts
Eye Spy examines the process of entering the world of surveillance and intelligence gathering and what every trainee should know exercises to test the skill and determination of undercover intelligence operatives (both qualified and in training) regularly occur, and yes, they occasionally take place in cities and towns or the countryside to add an air of authenticity to proceedings. Other surveillance training takes place in specially constructed or controlled environments.

Before an 'operative in training' is allowed to participate in real high-level operations, he or she must take various tests and learn the methods of their new employers. It's back to the classroom. Questions relating to fitness, eyesight and hearing are obvious. But what of the trainee's observational skills, or acting ability - essential in 'acting
normally' in ordinary, unusual or difficult situations? Training in the use of surveillance equipment is also necessary, so too is knowing how to wear or place covert devices. Many of these skills can be learned by training with a reputable agency, but when working for the government, there are rules and strict guidelines to follow.

Then there is physical appearance. If a 7ft 9inch tall person seeks a career in street surveillance, he must either be brilliant or be able to walk quickly with a stoop, or mask his height in ways that are not obvious. And that's not easy. However, size, height, age, race, religion or colour are not negative factors and each in itself could prove invaluable in different operations...

COMPETITION

In the Dark Arts feature trainees are eventually tasked with securing intelligence about a suspected terrorist who frequents a bar. They must also determine areas in the bar most suitable for placing covert cameras and listening devices. Eye Spy readers are invited to examine this photo and submit their own answers. Three readers will win a covert camera detector. Test your skills!


Mail Surprise:
Eye Spy looks at what should and should not be done when a suspicious package or letter arrives on your door step

It's the easiest, though hardly the most effective way to deliver a bomb or deadly substance to a location, office or individual. During its journey a multitude of things can happen to a package that results in it not reaching its destination, yet despite spectacular advances in mail security and screening, the odd item will get through. However, the sender will always be uncertain, and furthermore, once the item is discovered, tests can take place on its content, outer-packaging and from whence it came and was
posted. Eye Spy has learned that terrorists are again examining the 'route one' method to deliver their deadly message. Sadly, it's likely those working in the delivery system are more vulnerable than the intended receiver. But there are actions and procedures than can lessen the risk.


Pay as you go Espionage:
CIA and other US intelligence agencies look to contract agencies or retired spies to plug 'intel gaps'

It's not unusual for any intelligence agency to use secure 'contract firms' for certain tasks, but there is growing concern among some senior officials at the CIA, that the increasing use of 'green badgers' (non-agency personnel who attend secret meetings or perform alongside full time government operatives), may be harmful in the long term.

Others disagree, noting the use of contract personnel - many with 20+ years of experience in the field - helps augment current operations and allows new
employees time to develop and be trained. 'Why throw away years of training and not use it to good measure?' a former intelligence officer told Eye Spy. Nevertheless, intelligence watchers believe if the CIA suddenly stopped using contractors, a serious shortfall in its ability to perform worldwide would result.

Eye Spy examines the often lucrative world of 'pay as you go espionage'.


The MI6 Crest:
Eye Spy solves the mystery of Britain's MI6 crest

Eye Spy's feature on intelligence and security crests (issue 43) certainly attracted a great deal of interest. So too did our giant intel crests poster which was warmly received by hundreds of readers. But not everyone was happy! Two Canadian intelligence officers wrote to say the NORAD crest should be flagged a joint USA-Canadian crest (on the poster it states USA). We also received a few e-mails from intelligence services wanting to know why their crest or seal never appeared. Unfortunately we did write to over 100 services but many failed to respond, or simply said 'no crest exists'. However, since then, many services have forwarded images so a new feature
and second poster is being planned for next year.

We also received dozens of messages and letters from military personnel requesting a similar exercise be done for international armed forces. That's a huge task in that thousands exist! It's likely that Eye Spy will feature special forces and elite units in a future edition.

The unusual crest mysteriously surfaced on the Internet about 10 years ago, yet we can now reveal the MI6 visualisation crest is definitely....


INFILTRATION

The complex and dangerous world of undercover agents, the forwarding of intelligence, and some of the methods used to communicate, infiltrate, observe and conceal...

Depending on the environment, circumstances, and often country of operation, working undercover and acquiring and communicating intelligence poses major
problems. Infiltrating a suspected terrorist cell, crime gang or any illegal operation with an embedded operative is both difficult and dangerous, but not impossible. In recent times at least six suspected terrorist cells in Canada, Britain and America, have been successfully infiltrated by actual operatives. In each case the members of the cells had associations with al-Qaida.

To breach any terror cell's security the authorities must first try and establish who its core members are, the lead players and their association with each other. Beyond this, the group may use peripheral personnel who have some knowledge of the group's intent, though not necessarily be aware of operational plans, or indeed, the identity of all the core members. Many terrorist groups in the 1970s and 80s were small in number and confined to a specific area of operation. The Bologna (Italy) based group - Red Brigades - formed by student protesters who dedicated themselves to an 'armed struggle' against the 'capitalist state' were notorious for attacking government
targets in the country. However, once an operative was caught, this often led to the capture of other terrorists. Today's terrorists are more cautious.


Operation Crevis:
Details emerge of the plot to blow-up the Houses of Parliament

Exactly 401 years ago, Guy Fawkes, a Yorkshireman, conspired with a group of Roman Catholic conspirators to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was
caught and subsequently executed. His death is remembered every year by millions of Britons on 5 November - Bonfire night. It's ironic therefore that a trial is taking place just a few miles away from the UK seat of power that also involves another alleged plot to demolish London's most famous buildings.

On the morning of 30 March 2004, anti-terrorist police arrested Omar Khyam and six other men after police discovered more than half a ton of ammonium
nitrate fertilizer in a storage facility near Heathrow Airport in west London. The police operation was codenamed Crevice and owed its genesis to an alleged interception of an instruction sent by al-Qaida commanders to operatives in the UK.

The trial of Khyam is currently taking place at the Old Bailey and is not expected to end until well into 2007. Eye Spy examines some of the disturbing testimony that reveals al-Qaida's growing menace and means to communicate is flourishing...


BARNHAM:
The defunct Cold War base with a chilling history

Tucked away in the glorious English countryside is a former military facility that hides a plethora of Cold War secrets...

Watch towers, crumbling concrete huts, barbed-wire fences, seemingly oddly designed pathways and roads and a number of strange buildings indicate this
was no ordinary facility.

Eye Spy takes a look at what remains of RAF Barnham - a former top secret base once used to house Britain's first nuclear deterrent... the Blue Danube


DIY EYE SPY
Eye Spy launches its new series of professional DIY 'spycraft'

In the coming issues of Eye Spy we will not tell you where to acquire spy equipment - we will show you how to BUILD it - inexpensively and without
needing a degree in electronics. These projects can be built with off-the-shelf parts and can be put together in a few hours - or in the following example - a few minutes. All the projects can be modified, mixed or matched to create an arsenal of spy tools.

Future projects include how to build a telephone voice changer, parabolic dish microphone, wall clock camera, bug detectors, room transmitter, night
vision fire detector camera, outdoor night vision illuminator, spy camera killer and resurrect deleted data from a computer and many more devices
associated with the world of espionage. Use the printed material responsibly.

In this feature we reveal how a cheap mini-camera can be turned into a powerful zoom video camera - all for the price of a rubber band, two milk
bottle tops and a dab of super clue....


Bridge to North Africa:
Suspected al-Qaida recruiters arrested in London following major surveillance operations across Europe

Following a series of high-profile MI5 operations in the UK, British anti-terrorist police swooped on a restaurant in south London known as The
Bridge to China Town and other residential addresses nearby. Officers detained several men who had just started to enjoy an evening meal. The raid
was intelligence-led indicating MI5 had monitored the group's movement and were aware of their destination in Borough Road. About 50 armed officers
raced into the restaurant at about 10.00pm on 1 September 2006.


Blood Money:
European Court rewards British traitor

George Blake, one of Britain's most notorious traitors responsible for the deaths of dozens of British agents has been awarded £3,000 ($5,750) and
£1,340 costs by judges sitting in the European Court of Human Rights. The money relates to profits over his 1989, autobiography, No Other Choice. A
large section of the book focused on his work as an MI6 officer. Blake had already received about £60,000 in royalties before the UK Government started
legal action to 'stop him profiting from the book.' A further £90,000 was frozen. In May 2003 his lawyers started another action and argued that his
'human rights were being breached' - he was awarded £5,000 in compensation. In 1960, Blake was 'outed' as a KGB spy, but not before he had caused
immense damage to British intelligence. Blake served in MI6 from 1944 to 1961, but unbeknown to his superiors, in 1951, started spying for the
Soviets. At his trial (behind camera) in 1961, the UK Government initiated a clever plan to try and limit the damage he had caused from the media. They
even suggested Blake, born in Holland, had never been involved in intelligence work.

Blake was handed down a 42-year prison term, but only served five years after his dramatic escape from Wormwood Scrubs prison in London.

Besides being responsible for the deaths of dozens of British agents, it was Blake who also revealed the secret CIA Berlin spy tunnel to the Soviets. The
joint MI6-CIA tunnel had been built directly under the Soviet Embassy in Berlin.

Eye Spy also has a special feature on the tunnel, including a rare photo showing engineers and MI6 officers at work inside the structure.


Gas Limos Project:
Arrest of al-Qaida's 'codemaker' results in MI5 operation

On 12 October 2006, Dhiren Barat admitted planning for a series of attacks against key buildings and locations in an operation he himself dubbed 'The
Gas Limos Project'. Barat also pleaded guilty to charges that he intended to cause mayhem by exploding a radioactive 'dirty bomb' and three vehicles
packed with explosives in underground carparks. MI5 regard his arrest as one of the most significant ever in the fight against terrorism.

The operation was possible due to the arrest of a bomb suspect two years earlier. Police discovered a huge amount of intelligence from a computer
belonging to a man suspected of being al-Qaida's chief 'codemaker'.

The intelligence gleaned by MI5 and Scotland Yard is substantial. The London cell are accused of plotting to bring down several US skyscrapers -
including the Citicorp building in Manhattan. Barat also admitted planning to use a radioactive 'dirty bomb' and pack three limousines with explosives...

The facts behind the Gas Limo Project revealed - complete with exclusive photographs of US security services the moment MI5 contacted the FBI and
notified them of the plan to strike US targets.


The Enigmas:
And other recovered artefacts of U-85

Enigma's World War II history is inextricably linked with that of the Unterseeboote (U-Boat). The wreckage of U-85 commanded by Oberleutnant zur
See Eberhard Greger, a Type VIIB that sank on 14 April 1942 under gunfire and depth charges from the USS Roper with the loss of all 46 hands, lies in
approximately one hundred feet of water off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

U-85 was participating in the attacks on merchant shipping along the eastern seaboard of the United States that began in earnest with Operation
Paukenschlag on 13 January 1942. U-85 was the first boat lost during these operations and was in fact the first U-boat sunk by a US Navy warship in WWII.

At the time of the sinking US Navy divers were unable to recover anything of cryptologic significance, despite attempts to do so. Citing contemporary
reports, the U-85 was '...lying nearly flat on her starboard side...' and suggests this as the reason for the failure of navy divers to gain entry to
the boat despite '...about one hundred descents to the wreck.' Any consideration of raising U-85 to the surface by pneumatic means was soon
abandoned owing to the considerable damage to the boat's ballast tanks caused by Roper's depth charges.

In August of 1997, amateur diver Roy E. Parker, during his first exploration of U-85, recovered two oak boxes containing the spare wheels for two
different Enigmas. A study of these wheels determined that U-85 had been carrying two Enigmas whose inventory numbers were M2946 and M3131. The boxes
were recovered from a cabinet on the bulkhead adjacent to the captain's quarters.

David Hamer provides a fascinating insight into the Enigmas recovery, their restoration and importance to the world of codebreaking.


Cyber Terrorism

Intelligence analyst Kevin Coleman examines the growing threat of cyber terrorism and the dangers that lurk just around the corner

Cyber-terrorism or attacks on telecommunications and computer networks have been called the invisible threat to national economies and security. Day
after day, digital warriors defend our information systems and infrastructure against thousands of unseen attacks by criminals and
terrorists. This intelligence brief will help you fully appreciate the growing threat of cyber terrorism, the offensive capabilities of cyber
terrorists, and the defensive measures that can be taken in response to such dangers. Included in this brief will be actual intelligence and scenarios
that pose a significant threat to our national information and telecommunications infrastructure.

Terrorism and information technology are related in two ways. First, the Internet has become a forum for both terrorist groups and individual
terrorists to spread their messages of hate and violence. The internet allows terrorists to communicate with one another and with sympathisers.
Secondly, individuals and groups use the Internet to attack computer networks and systems via cyber-terrorism or cyber-warfare activities.

The term 'cyber-terrorism' conjures up many different images. The truth is, cyber terrorism has been around longer than most people think. Cyber
terrorism did not evolve after the terror attacks on 11 September 2001. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, cyber terrorism is any
premeditated, politically motivated attack against information, computer systems, computer programmes, networks and data, which results in violence,
disruption or damage against non-combatant targets by sub-national groups or clandestine agents....

This fascinating article also includes a virus threat timeline


MI5 and University Spying:
Watchers target al-Qaida's on-campus recruiters

As reported two years ago in Eye Spy, British intelligence is surveilling UK universities in an attempt to expose infiltration by al-Qaida. An 18-page
draft report was obtained by a newspaper that outlines plans to monitor the activities of certain sections of the student population. The document,
allegedly drafted by the Department for Education acknowledges that some universities may see the move as akin to 'big brother' or that lecturers may
feel they are spying for a 'secret police state'. Full story...


Winter Cometh:
Vehicle Surveillance Tips

During any vehicle surveillance in winter operatives may have to deal with adverse weather conditions. Eye Spy's surveillance advisors have listed a
few points of interest - some are obvious, some are not so obvious, but all should be mandatory.... including a potato.


POWER MONEY
EYE SPY PRODUCT REVIEW

We've all been there. Away from home, nowhere near the car, on a train or coach and you haven't got the mains powered charger with you (which is fine
because you don't have access to a wall socket anyway) and your cell phone or laptop computer has just run out of battery power. Or maybe your
surveillance camera battery has just died and the target is getting away or your radio is out of range and you find it necessary to revert to a cell
phone... but the battery has just failed. Well, there is a new product on the market which will help you avoid such situations - it's called The 'PowerMonkey'.

Small size, light weight and cleverly crafted design, plus its highly competitive cost means the device is likely to become an essential piece of
kit in future months.

Our experts take the PowerMonkey for a 'test drive'.


American - Treason Charge:
US citizen charged with treason

Adam Gadahn, alias, Azzam the American', a 28-year-old California man has been charged with treason and providing material support to a terrorist
group for making a series of propaganda videotapes for al-Qaida, including one in which he praised the hijackers involved in the 9/11 attacks and
referred to the United States as 'enemy soil.' Gadahn is the first person to be charged with treason against the USA since the World War II era.


The Al-Jazeera Affair:
Britons face Official Secrets Act charges

A date has been set for the trial of former Cabinet Office spokesman David Keogh and former parliamentary researcher Leo O'Connor, who are accused of
violating Section 3 of Britain's Official Secrets Act by leaking a secret memo in which President Bush was said to have told Prime Minister Tony Blair
in April 2004 of a plan to bomb Arab broadcaster Al-Jazeera at the height of the US campaign against Iraqi insurgents in Fallujah. Background story...


EYE SPY EQUIPMENT
SEVERAL NEW PRODUCTS FOR YOUR ATTENTION

Eye Spy has received numerous requests for a transmitter disguised as a computer mouse... well, we are pleased to announce that a quality device is
now available. It's a working mouse that is activated once the computer is switched on. Ideal for monitoring sounds and conversations. We also have a
smart working telephone voice changer; a telephone line recorder and other devices.

For the professional, Eye Spy has secured the rights to stock a superb deleted cell phone text message product. a cell phone interceptor and two
car tracking products that have the ability to listen to in-car conversations....


Other Features: A brief round-up of additional reports and features

A-BOMB. North Korea detonates underground nuclear bomb. Analysts believe
missile delivery system is now inevitable

SPY WARS. Georgian security services detain several Russian Army officers in
spy row. Georgia insists it has broken up a major spy ring

VODAFONE. Vodafone faces an enormous fine after Greek Government says it did
not do enough to stop over 100 cell phones being intercepted in run-up to
2004 Olympic Games

INTELLIGENCE SUMMIT. A date has been set for the popular International
Summit in the USA

BIN-LADEN 2000. A video showing terrorist leader Osama bin-Laden and a
number of the 9/11 hijackers, including Atta, has aired on satellite
television. Analysts are calling the tape an 'intelligence gem'

SPY MOSCOW. Russia continues to arrest academics in huge espionage purge.


UNDERCOVER TRADE BOOK RELEASES. The latest intelligence, tradecraft and
espionage books


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44

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